Cross cultural communication issues in international

Cultural differences in communication examples

Even when cultures share similar forms of dress, the message inherent in the choice of clothing is not always the same. Finally, proxemics or how far apart people stand when speaking or how far apart they sit in meetings carries significant information to people who share the same culture. For example, in many nations the size, layout, and furnishings of a business office communicate a message. Consequently, the need for dealing with intercultural differences and cross-cultural communication barriers has grown as well. The message given by polished shoes, for instance, could easily be lost on a culture in which sandals are the standard footwear. At any moment that we're dealing with people different from ourselves, the likelihood is that they carry a similar list of hopes and fears in their back pocket. Personal relationships are determined by the terms of the job. While fairly steady eye contact in the United States may indicate the listener's interest and attentiveness, intense eye contact may prove disconcerting.

Communication, then, can be seen as being high or low in contexting. This develops a system in which influence and close circles of contacts among those screening for those higher up create an informal and unofficial business hierarchy.

In control cultures, such as those in much of Europe and North America, technology is customarily viewed as an innately positive means for controlling the environment.

cross cultural communication barriers

The contexting implications of this variance in the emphasis on the actual word are far-reaching for business. To effectively suggest such a course of action, however, one would need to communicate this in a manner adjusted to the way that employees would likely react to so distressing an order.

Cross cultural communication challenges

Consequently, business relations are enhanced when managerial, sales, and technical personnel are trained to be aware of areas likely to create communication difficulties and conflict across cultures. Control cultures tend to describe themselves as the "industrialized nations. Even if you're bilingual, slang, jokes and figures of speech can cause problems. For example, we can acquire a new culture by moving to a new region, by a change in our economic status, or by becoming disabled. If you comply with a request for a bribe in any country, corruption charges are a likely complication. Cultures with high contexting are more concerned with face, that is, preserving prestige or outward dignity. If you are facing a similar challenge, follow these three steps to communicate more effectively and improve relationships with your international colleagues. Just as importantly, people often bring to a crosscultural meeting ethnocentric prejudices regarding what they believe to be proper dress. Conversely, the person with larger personal space conception might feel the encroaching speaker to be pushy, overly aggressive, or rude. Meeting colleagues with whom you have been working will likely strengthen your relationship with them. Often, though, the reason people use the resources available to them in the manner that they do is because it makes good business sense to use them in that fashion within the context of their own cultural views. In control cultures, such as those in much of Europe and North America, technology is customarily viewed as an innately positive means for controlling the environment.

She identifies the United States as a very low-context culture in the communication scale. The companies I have worked for have a strong record of periodically sending US team members to other countries and global colleagues to the US office.

aspects of cross cultural communication

The message given by polished shoes, for instance, could easily be lost on a culture in which sandals are the standard footwear. Start out with conservative outfits in neutral colors until you learn what's respectful and appropriate, she suggests.

If a road approaches a mountain, the road may simply stop at the mountain. The result in a business situation could be disastrous.

In low context cultures, emphasis on explicit communication leads to a rigid adherence to law while in high context cultures the law is seen as flexible to accommodate different situations.

In working with cultures such as Israel and Sweden, which have a relatively decentralized authority conception or small "power distance," one might anticipate greater acceptance of a participative communication management model than in cultures such as France and Belgium, which generally make less use of participative management models, relying instead on authority-based decision making.

international and cross-cultural issues will affect quizlet

Zakaria, Norhayati.

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Think global: How to overcome cultural communication challenges